Category Archives: Meetups

ER of presenting at DDD Melbourne By Night meetup (10th September 2020)

In response to a tweet looking for speakers for an online meetup organized by DDD Melbourne By Night, I submitted an idea – “Testing is not dead!” – and it was accepted.

I had a few weeks to prepare for this short (ten-minute) talk and went through my usual process of sketching out the content in a mindmap first (using the free version of XMind), then putting together a short slide deck (in PowerPoint) to cover that content.

I find it harder to nail down my content for short talks like this than for a typical longer conference track talk. The restricted time forces focus and I landed on just a few key points: looking at the claims of “testing is dead”, defining what “testing” means to me (and contrasting with “checking”), where automation fits in, and wrapping up with a few tips for non-specialist testers (as this is primarily a meetup with a developer audience).

I did two practice runs of the talk over the same conference call technology that the meetup would be using (Zoom), even though my willing audience of one (my wife) was only in the next room at home! I find practice runs to be an essential part of my preparation and I was pleased to find both runs coming in very close to the ten-minute timebox.

The September DDD by Night meetup took place on the evening of 10th September and featured nine lightning talks with some preamble and also time for questions between each talk. I was third up on the bill and managed to whizz through my talk in a few seconds under ten minutes! The content seemed to be well received and some of my ideas were clearly new to this audience, so I was pleased to have the opportunity to spread my opinion about testing to a different part of the Melbourne tech community.

Lee kicking off his talk

It was also great to see Vanessa Morgan as a first-time presenter during this meetup and her talk was a very polished performance.

Thanks to the DDD Melbourne crew for putting on meetup events during these interesting times and, as a newcomer, the friendly community spirit in this group was obvious.

You can watch my talk on YouTube.

Kevlin Henney at the “Software Art Thou?” meetup (Melbourne, 7th March 2019)

The latest in Zendesk’s excellent “Software Art Thou?” meetup series saw the UK’s Kevlin Henney addressing a packed house (of over 100) in Melbourne on the evening of 7th March.

Kevlin is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He is co-author of A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing and On Patterns and Pattern Languages, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series. He is also editor of 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know and 97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know.

The talk was advertised as follows:

“It’s just semantics.” How many conversations about philosophy, politics and programming are derailed by this thought-stopping comment?

Semantics is all about meaning. If there is one thing we struggle with and need to get better at, it is the search for and clarification of meaning. The world in which a software system lives is filled with meaning. The structure, concepts and names that inform the code, its changes and the mental models held by developers and others business roles are expressions of meaning. The very act of development is an exercise in meaning — its discovery, its formulation, its communication. Paradigms, processes and practices are anchored in different ways of thinking about and arriving at meaning.

But just because we are immersed in concepts of meaning from an early age, and just because the daily work of software development is about wrangling meaning, and just because it’s just semantics, that doesn’t mean we’re necessarily good at it. It takes effort and insight. Let’s talk about what we mean.

Kevlin’s talk was titled “What do you mean?” which he quickly modified to “WTF do you mean?”. He kicked off by talking about abstraction and this quote from Dijkstra:

The purpose of abstraction is not to be vague but to create a new semantic level in which one can be absolutely precise

He pointed out that when we’re criticized for trying to be precise with language with statements such as “It’s just semantics”, we need to remember that this literally means”It’s just meaning” so why wouldn’t we seek that?!

Turning specifically to software development, Kevlin argued that code, tests, scripts, etc. are all “code”, literally the codification of knowledge. Software development, to him, is a process of knowledge acquisition through learning, communication and social negotiation. Software architecture is a model of participation with design comprising synthesis and analysis (which are opposites of each other).

An Ernest Hemingway quote came next:

The only kind of writing is rewriting

Kevlin argued that software development is the production of variation, it’s not manufacturing – kudos to him for this messaging, it’s still all too common to see this ill-placed manufacturing/factory model placed on software development and it leads to nonsense like “Quality Assurance” when we really should be talking about testing. He also made the good point that what we do is straddling natural and programming languages.

Kevlin said that the domain (whatever it is) always looks very different from the inside and that:

Your customer doesn’t mean what they say

They use their terms and context, they leave out significant details (what they don’t say), they make assumptions, and actually don’t know what they want in the first place (it’s just a property of humans)!

As an argument for iterative development and the idea of slowing down to become faster, he quoted Neil Gaiman:

You learn from finishing things

There is a big difference between speed and velocity, with the latter being overloaded by the agile community. He claimed speed often leads to us “building the wrong thing brilliantly” rather than going slower in the right direction.

He made another excellent point as he was close to finishing up around our modern fascination with “prioritizing by business value”, with the suggestion we say “estimated business value” as this judgement of value is itself prone to error.

This was a very professionally-delivered talk, serious in nature but delivered with anecdotes and some dry British humour along the way, supported by a very nice slide deck.

Zendesk always put on a great meetup and this was no exception. Their space is large and airy with excellent audio visual facilities plus they lay on a lot of finger food and a well-stocked (and varied) bar service. The quality of their presenters is also always top notch and, although I wasn’t familiar with Kevlin and his work, this was a really engaging (even after talking non-stop for seventy minutes!) and interesting talk on a topic that gets scant treatment in the software development industry – and also in testing, specifically. Many of us in the context-driven testing community are often accused of playing semantic games but, as Kevlin ably demonstrated, conveying meaning is critically important and genuinely difficult to do well.

Pre-TiCCA19 conference meetup

In the weeks leading up to the Testing in Context Conference Australia 2019, our thoughts turned to how we might sneak in a meetup event alongside the conference to make the most of the fact that Melbourne would be home to so many awesome testers at the same time.

Thanks to the conference venue – the Jasper Hotel – giving us use of one of our workshop rooms for an evening and also food & drink sponsorship by House of Test (Switzerland), the meetup became feasible and a bit of social media advertising coupled with a free Eventbrite campaign led to about twenty keen testers (including a number of TiCCA19 conference speakers) assembling at the Jasper on the evening of Thursday 28th February.

Some pre-meetup networking gave people the chance to make new friends as well as giving the conference speakers a chance to meet some of their fellow presenters. After I gave a very brief opening, it was time for the content to kick off in the shape of a presentation by well-known and respected Kiwi context-driven tester, Aaron Hodder. His talk was titled “Inclusive Collaboration – how our differences can make the difference” in which he explored how having a neurodiverse workforce can give you a competitive edge, and how the workplace can respect diverse needs and different requirements for interaction and collaboration to bring out the best in everyone’s differences. This was a beautifully-crafted talk, delivered with Aaron’s unique blend of personal connection to the topic and a smattering of self-deprecation, while still driving home a hard-hitting message. (Aaron also shared some great resources on Inclusive Collaboration at https://goo.gl/768M0u).

Aaron Hodder addresses the meetupAaron Hodder addresses the meetupThe idea of "My user manual" presented by Aaron Hodder

A short networking break then gave everyone the chance to mingle some more and clean up the remains of the food, before we kicked off the panel session. Ably facilitated by Rich Robinson, the panel consisted of four TiCCA19 speakers, in the shape of Graeme Harvey, Aaron Hodder, Sam Connelly and Ben Simo. The conversation was driven by a few questions from Rich: How have you seen the testing role change in your career? How do you think the testing role will change into the future? Is the manual testing role dead? The resulting 45-minute discussion between the panel and audience was engaging and interesting – and kudos to Rich for such a great job in running the panel.

Graeme, Aaron, Sam and Ben talking testing during the panel sessionGraeme, Aaron, Sam and Ben talking testing during the panel session

We enjoyed putting this meetup on for the Melbourne testing community and the feedback from everyone involved was very positive, so thanks again to everyone who made it happen.

Attending the pre-TestBash Sydney Testers meetup

Arriving in Sydney the day before our presentation at the Ministry of Testing‘s TestBash Australia 2018 conference allowed me (along with Paul Seaman) to attend the pre-TestBash meetup organized by the well-known Sydney Testers group.

The meetup was held in the offices of Gumtree, up on the 22nd floor of the tower at 1 York Street in the CBD. On entering their office, the most striking feature was the simply stunning view it affords their lucky employees of the famous Sydney Harbour Bridge. The other noticeable thing about this relatively newly-renovated space for the company is that it has been furnished using items themselves sourced from the Gumtree platform, so no cookie-cutter corporate office furnishings here!

View of the Sydney harbour bridge from the Gumtree office

It was good to see a decent crowd of about thirty people enjoying the free food and drinks before the “main event”, viz. Trish Koo with her short presentation on “The Future of Testing”. She covered some interesting predictions in her talk, including:

  • Exploratory Testing will be really weird
  • End to end testing will become meaningless
  • Black box testing will be cool again
  • Testers may be the only ones who can stop the robot apocalypse

This was at least a very different treatment compared to the many similarly-named talks out there. Her hand-drawn slides were another point of difference and she certainly got some interesting reactions from the audience! The Q&A afterwards was engaging, but still left ample time for us all to mingle before we formally overstayed our welcome at Gumtree!

Richard Bradshaw and Trish Koo

Trish says testers may be the only ones who can stop the Robot Apocalypse!

A vision of everyone working together from Trish Koo

It was good to see Richard Bradshaw there representing Ministry of Testing as well as TestBash Australia conference organizers, David Greenlees and Anne-Marie Charrett. Thanks to Sam Connelly and the Sydney Testers crew for putting on a good meetup in the run up to TestBash, it’s always good to mingle with the local testing community before a major event in another city.

(First three photos above from Michele Playfair, the last one from Paul Maxwell-Walters.)

Pre-CASTx18 meetup with Katrina Clokie

With Katrina Clokie being one of my invited keynotes for the CASTx18 conference, she kindly offered to give a meetup-style talk on the evening before the conference. After some searching around for a suitable venue, the AST kindly sponsored the event as part of their deal at the Langham Hotel so I could then advertise the event. I used a free Eventbrite account and easily sold out the meetup simply via promotion on Twitter and LinkedIn.

View from my room at the Langham Hotel

When it came to the evening of Tuesday 27th February, the lovely Flinders Room in the Langham had been nicely laid out and keen participants started arriving early and partaking of the fine food and beverages on offer. We left a good half-hour for people to arrive and network before kicking off the meetup at 6pm.

Ilari Henrik Aegerter formally initiated proceedings, starting with an acknowledgement of country to the traditional owners of the land on which the event was being held and then talking about the mission and activities of the AST. Next up, I introduced Katrina and she took the stage to a crowd of about 25 keen listeners.

Katrina spoke for about 45-minutes, sharing four first-person experience stories and referencing them back to her book, “A Practical Guide to Testing in DevOps”. Her experience of working in a DevOps environment within a large bank has given her lots of opportunity to gain experience in different teams at different stages of their DevOps journey. She made a deliberate choice to include a story of failure too, always a good idea as there are often more learnings to be had from failure than success. Katrina’s easy presentation style makes her content both engaging and readily consumable, with great practical takeaways. The lengthy Q&A session after her talk indicated that many people found the content relevant and went away with ideas to try in their own workplaces.

Katrina giving her presentation Katrina giving her presentation Katrina giving her presentation

We still had the room and catering for another half-hour or so after Katrina’s talk, so there were some excellent discussions and further questions for Katrina before we wrapped up. The feedback from participants was overwhelmingly positive, both in terms of the awesome content from Katrina’s talk and also the venue facilities, service & catering.

My personal thanks go to Katrina for offering to do a talk of this nature for the Melbourne testing community and also to the AST for making it happen within such a beautiful venue (with a big shout out to Valerie Gryfakis for doing all the leg work with the hotel).

(If you haven’t already bought a copy, Katrina’s book is an excellent resource for anyone involved in modern development projects, packed full of advice and examples, and is very reasonably priced – check it out on LeanPub. I’ve previously written a review of the book on this blog too.)

ER of presenting at the ANZTB SIGiST (Melbourne, 27th July 2017)

Continuing our recent run of presentations together, Paul Seaman and I were happy to accept an invitation to deliver our talk “A Spectrum of Difference – Creating EPIC Software Testers” at the Melbourne ANZTB SIGiST on 27th July.

The Australia New Zealand Testing Board holds these Special Interest Groups in Software Testing a few times a year all around Australia and this particular chilly July evening drew a crowd of about sixty, lured by the promise of a couple of good presentations (and some free food & drinks!) It was a pretty slow start but a swag of arrivals around the 5.30pm start time meant that, as the first presenters of the evening, we had a good crowd in front of us. Michael Pollino did the ANZTB spiel to kick things off before we were up.

The presentation again went really well and co-presenting is becoming more and more comfortable for Paul and I. We were delighted that so many people came up to us after the talk to express their interest in what we’re doing, offer their help, or just say thanks. It’s always a nice feeling as a presenter when people make the effort to catch up for a chat afterwards, so thanks to everyone who did that. We’ve also had follow ups in the days after the talk, which is fantastic too.

Lee at the ANZTB SIGIST

The mid-session food was quickly demolished and the well-stocked bar also did good trade. Jules Barnes (from AccessHQ) rounded out the evening with his talk “How to be a testing Gladiator”.

Thanks to the ANZTB for the opportunity to share our story. If you know anyone who might be suited to the software testing training we offer through EPIC Recruit Assist, please encourage them to apply.

(You can also read about this event via the ANZTB blog.)

My first Sydney Testers Meetup – 20 February 2017

The Sydney Testers meetup is one of the largest software testing meetup groups in the world and they hold meetups and other gatherings very frequently in the Sydney CBD.

With the CASTx conference taking place on 21st February, the group organized a meetup the evening before in the offices of IAG (just across the road from the conference venue, The Grace Hotel) and so I went along to take part in my first Sydney Testers meetup event.

It was a complicated and diligent security operation that meant only those who had explicitly RSVP’d to the meetup would be allowed entry through the well-secured IAG building, so only around 50 people actually got into the meetup. The first 45-minutes or so were an opportunity to network over pizza and drinks and it was good to meet up with some familiar faces from both the local (Australia and New Zealand) and international testing community, as well as chat with some unfamiliar testers.

It was Eric Proegler’s job to kick off proceedings at 6.15pm and he talked about the Association for Software Testing (organizers of the CASTx event), for which he is a board member and had travelled from the US to be at the conference. Eric has been a key player in expanding AST’s reach outside of North America, with the CASTx conference being their first conference outside of those shores (and hence confirming his joke that AST does not stand for “American Software Testers”!).

The 2000th member of the meetup was in the house and received a gift for their trouble, this is a seriously big group and it was instrumental in helping to bring the CASTx conference to Australia, so kudos to Sydney Testers for their efforts.

The first 50-minutes of the meetup were devoted to a panel Q&A session on “Questions Facing Software Testing”, with the panel consisting of some serious testing talent:

The first question was around whether “manual testing” is dead. Goranka talked about the “death of quality”, thanks to SaaS delivery and the ability to fix very quickly when customers discover a problem. Aaron questioned the use of the term “manual testing” but managed to avoid ranting too much, noting that “testing looks like it’s easy to understand” when in fact it isn’t. Michael Bolton, sitting just behind me in the audience, pointed out that as testers “our job is to demolish unwarranted confidence”.

The next question simply asked “What are the top three challenges facing software testing today?” It came down to Eric, Ilari and Aaron to proffer one challenge each, viz. “explaining what good testing is to people who think they already know what testing is”, “not losing your humour” and “describing our value to stakeholders” respectively.

The third question was “Why hasn’t the AST had global reach and how is software testing different in different parts of the world?” Ilari suggested that previous AST boards made up entirely of Americans hadn’t helped the situation. On the topic of differences between testing around the world, Eric suggested that there were no big differences but Goranka strongly disagreed and said she’d recently travelled to New Zealand mainly to get the different perspectives from their testing community. She also mentioned that ISTQB is more favoured in some parts of the world than others, with Europe being “in love with ISTQB”. Ilari came back to the discussion and said the main differences around the world were simply “just different flavours of stupidity” when it comes to testing!

Question four was “Can we show senior managers what better testing looks like? Can we win the battle?” The panel were fairly pessimistic in answering this question, with Eric pointing out that only a very small percentage of testers attend conferences or meetups, but the AST really want to reach disengaged testers to help them become more passionate about their craft. Ilari noted that “most people in testing don’t give a sh*t” (like in most professions, he argued). Aaron spoke from his experience in consulting and noted that many testers & their managers are “cut off from the outside world and better ideas” in their organizations with a “cult-like” devotion to following company processes.

With time running out, one more question was directed to the panel, “What should we as a testing community be focused on next?” Eric suggested looking at robots and automation in general, Ilari said we should focus more on continuous learning in general rather than a particular technology, Goranka said all things Cloud (but especially around performance and security), and Aaron suggested doubling-down on the human stuff (UX, systems thinking, ethics, etc) in a world where we are now able to “churn out crap faster than ever”.

This was a good-natured panel session and it was interesting that even these highly-regarded individuals (most of whom associate themselves very strongly with the context-driven testing community) disagreed on many things but were able to maintain a civilized and engaging discussion.

A fifteen-minute break was welcome, before the group reformed for the next part of the meetup. This part was led by Paul Holland and Michael Bolton, who ran one of the exercises from the Rapid Software Testing (RST) class with the entire group. I’ve been lucky enough to attend RST twice and had already seen their chosen exercise before, so I chose to observe rather than participate.

The exercise was the so-called Wason Selection Task, by cognitive psychologist Peter Wason. This seemingly simple puzzle occupied the next 40-minutes or so and made for a great group exercise. It was interesting to watch people fall into the traps along the way and also to see Paul & Michael drawing the testing-related learnings from it along the way. If you haven’t seen this puzzle before, go try it!

Paul Holland fields questions for the panel of Eric, Ilari, Aaron and Goranka  Paul Holland and the Wason selection task

The meetup wrapped up at around 8.30pm and it was great to see a bunch of such passionate and engaged testers in the one room, a good experience at my first Sydney Testers event!

Resources

Sydney Testers Twitter handle: @SydneyTesters

Sydney Testers meetup site website: https://www.meetup.com/Sydney-Testers/

Living up to my handle: rocking and testing in Belfast

I was lucky enough to find myself in Northern Ireland recently, with a trip based around attending one of Status Quo‘s final ‘electric’ shows in Belfast. This was my first trip to Northern Ireland and it was a very enjoyable few days. Visiting the stunning North coast around the Giant’s Causeway was a highlight, as was exploring the varied districts of the city of Belfast itself, from the colourful (both literally and figuratively) walls of the Falls/Shanklin area to the stunning City Hall.

So, firstly, the “rocker” part of the trip. The big SSE Arena would be home to Status Quo for one night on Friday 30th October. The Emerald Isle has always been good territory for the band and this gig would be no exception. Luckily, our hotel – the Premier Inn Titanic Quarter – was literally next door to the venue and our room had a view over the loading area at the back, so a perfect spot to keep an eye on proceedings during the day in the lead up to the gig. An early queue formed (as usual) and it was good to catch up with friends there and also make some new ones (one very generous bloke in the queue kindly gave my wife a free ticket so she could join me in attending the gig!). With doors opening a little later than usual (due to the Quo crew arriving late because of travel problems from the mainland to Ireland), the queue was very long by the time we were allowed in and it was a sprint down to the barrier, securing a spot centre stage.

Support came from Uriah Heep and they got a great reception, having not played live in this part of the world for over thirty years. While their brand of heavy rock (somewhat like Deep Purple to my ears) is not really to my taste, they did a good job of getting the 7-8000 strong audience involved and provided a good warm-up during their hour-long set.

At just after 9pm, it was finally time for Quo to take the stage and it was another top performance, with Rick Parfitt’s replacement, Richie Malone, getting a particularly warm welcome in his home territory. There were no setlist surprises (it is Status Quo after all!) but, as always with a live gig, there are subtle differences from night to night and the encouragable crowd made this a very enjoyable show.

quobelfast2quobelfast4quobelfast5quobelfast7

Now, where does the “tester” fit into the trip? Well, luckily for me, the fairly new Belfast Tester meetup group had announced a meetup during one of the nights I was in Belfast (and thankfully not the same night as the Status Quo gig), so I decided to go along and see what this new testing community looks like.

It was the fourth meetup of the Belfast Testers Meetup group and it took place on the evening of Thursday 29th October, in the boardroom of Shopkeep. I was warmly welcomed as a “one off” attendee of the meetup, which drew a crowd of about 25 (many of whom were first-timers as you’d expect at such a new meetup). It’s always good to see a new community of testers being built and this one should do well, with strong leaders and a burgeoning IT industry in the city.

Meetup co-organizer Neill Boyd kicked off the meetup, after gathering up the crowd enjoying the hospitality and impressive surroundings of the Shopkeep office (all very “startuppy”) and funneling them into the boardroom. It was cosy, with 20+ of us in the room but it made for a good space for easy conversation and Q&A with the presenters.

His introduction was handy for newcomers, announced that the TestBash conference is adding Belfast to its growing list of city destinations in 2017, and outlined the agenda of two talks to fill the evening.

First up was Allan Hunter (Senior Tester at PwC Emerging Technologies team) with “User Focused Testing”. This short talk discussed how user research is a key ingredient in powering insightful testing. He talked on his experiences of user research and how this can be applied to more traditional testing activities. His basic message was that we as testers are well placed to test the problem and not just the solution. He packed a lot of cool content into ten minutes then held his own through a lengthy period of questioning.

Secondly, we had Ursula Wlodarczyk (a tester working in the startup, SaltDNA) with “Tester v s Designer: Why tester can make a great (UX) designer”. Ursula’s was a much longer talk and tried to cover a huge amount of ground, enough for at least a couple of good talks I’d say. She talked about exploring a tester’s skillset in the context of the User Experience field and, similarly to Allan, she recognizes that testers can provide great insights into design (not just at the user interface either) and organizations should be allowing testers the opportunities to engage in design meetings and provide their valuable insights and suggestions before the software is built. A very long talk for a meetup (it would actually make a decent conference talk), but some nice ideas and good resources.

The meetup kicks off  Allan Hunter presenting  Ursula Wlodarczyk presenting

So, thanks to Belfast and thanks to the two very different communities – Status Quo and testing – that continue to give me the chance to rock and test all over the world.

Being part of a community

There has been a lot of Twitter activity about the CDT community in the last couple of weeks. Katrina Clokie also penned an excellent blog post, A community discussion, and there seems to be a lot of unresolved disputes between different folks representing different parts of the testing community. Some of this just feels like the normal level of background noise spiking for a short time. It’s not the first time a storm of this type has blown itself up around the CDT community and it won’t be the last.

I particularly liked Katrina’s statement that “I strive to be approachable, humble and open to questions”, as this is also my own approach to both being a member of a testing community and also helping to bring others into it.

I have been heavily involved in the TEAM meetup to build a new testing community in Melbourne and also helping to make the Australian Testing Days conference happen (though I will not be involved in the future of the event). I write this blog in the hope of sharing my ideas and opinions and maybe bringing readers into my community as a result.

I’ve chosen not to add to the noise by responding to the Twitter commentary around the CDT community right now, but I don’t feel that my lack of contribution to the discussion either reflects approval or disapproval of the behaviour of any member of any of the communities that consider themselves CDT.

As I’ve blogged before, our Values and principles define us.

 

TEAM meetup number 11 – Michael Bolton!

The eleventh TEAM meetup was held on 26th May and we returned to a regular venue for us, Aconex‘s great space on Flinders Street in the Melbourne CBD. Thanks again to Aconex for their support in providing the venue, pizzas and drinks.

Our membership had increased to around 470 and we expected a big response when we announced this meetup as Michael Bolton was our headline act! Michael had been in town to run his Rapid Software Testing class (through TEAM) and also to give the opening keynote presentation at the Australian Testing Days 2016 conference.

On a cold and rainy evening, we were pleased to see around 35 of our members make the effort to attend and we kicked off proceedings at about 6pm (with early birds taking the lions share of the pizzas).

Michael kicked off by talking about a game he’s been playing recently, called Keep Talking And Nobody Explodes and some observations about playing this game in relation to software testing. He also gave us a 15-minute “lightning talk” on automation in testing and this was a fascinating example of how to talk about testing using clear language and make a compelling case for the use of automation to enhance the superpowers of humans as testers (rather than trying to replace them).

meetup11_1

The group was then formed into a number of teams, most playing the Keep Talking And Nobody Explodes game plus a few playing the famous Dice Game. An hour passed quickly and then the bomb game players shared some observations about their game playing and Michael shared more of his observations from his more considerable experience of playing it. Maybe check the game out for yourself and see what lessons you learn that you can apply to software testing along the way.

 

The meetup wrapped up just after 8pm and it was – as always – great to see a bunch of such passionate and engaged testers in the one room. Thanks to Michael for taking the time to attend the meetup and provide such an entertaining evening for us all.

For further meetup announcements, remember to follow our meetup.com page at:

 http://www.meetup.com/Test-Engineering-Alliance-Melbourne/

Also keep an eye on our website, http://www.testengineeringalliance.com, and you can also follow TEAM on social media, at: